Chat with us, powered by LiveChat

Steps to Goal Setting

Have you ever wondered how successful businesses and people do it?  Did you ever want to know how they rose to the top? Well, it’s quite simple and you can do it too!  One of the major factors in success is goal setting, but it’s not just setting the goal. The key to achieving your goals is writing them down.  Yes, it’s that simple! So, stop daydreaming about owning your own business or owning a home. Write it down! People are 42% more likely to accomplish their goals if they write them down on a regular basis. But, there’s more to goal setting than simply writing down what you want and wishing for it to come true.  You have to have some follow through and a plan of action. Let’s take a look at what it takes to create and achieve a goal.

The first step, we’ve already touched on.  You need to set a goal and write it down, but having any old goal won’t do.  General goals aren’t normally as successful as more specific ones. Take a look at your goal and break it down into parts.  Why is your goal important to you? How can you accomplish your goal? Is it relevant to you? When do you want to have this goal accomplished?  It’s important to have your goal written down and defined. If you write it down and examine what you want, you’ll really be able to figure out what’s motivating you.

Once you’ve figured out the what, when, where, and why of your goal, it’s important to figure out how to achieve it. You need a plan of action.  It’s not just enough to have a goal and write it down, you need to break it down step by step and really figure out how you’re going to get it done.  By breaking down your goal into concrete steps, you give yourself something to work with other than just the idea. It’s something to follow through on and commit to.  The more you want to achieve a goal and the more committed you are, the more likely you are to achieve it.

Let’s take a look at some examples.

The first goal is too broad.  There isn’t any direction or time frame, which will make it very difficult to follow through with.  It needs to be more specific, so you know what you want to achieve.

The second one is better.  It defines a definite goal, but it still isn’t the best.  When do you want to achieve the goal by?  You’re more likely to get the job done if you have a time frame.

The third example is a good goal.  It has a purpose and a time frame set. This way you know exactly when you want to have achieved your specific goal.

Bonus Tip:  Mark your goals and deadlines on your calendar with other important dates to help you track things more closely!  You’ll be more likely to succeed if you’re looking at your goals more often.

Your next step is to take that commitment and create a written statement.  Make yourself accountable for your goal. Make yourself follow through, but you don’t have to do it alone!  Studies show that there’s a 65% chance of completing a goal when you commit to someone else. Take your commitment statement and share it with your spouse or a friend.  Tell them how much it means to you and let them hold you accountable as well. Accomplishment is rarely done alone and it’s okay to ask for help!

Let’s take a look at an example written statement.  There are multiple ways to write your statement, but it should always include everything you need to accomplish your goal.

Once you’ve got yourself set up and have your spouse or trusted friend, it’s time for one last step: progress reports.  It may seem silly, but by creating progress reports, you can help yourself further. It’s part of the accountability process. You’re significantly more likely to achieve a desired goal if you give weekly progress reports to a friend.  

 

But, most importantly, keep trying!  The more difficult your goal, the more effort it’s going to take, but that doesn’t mean you should give up.  If something isn’t working, adjust your action plan and try again. It doesn’t mean you’re failing; maybe you just need to try a new tactic.  So, with all of this in mind, get out there and achieve your goals!on

Related Articles

What Detroit Poverty Really Looks Like – My Story

My name is Achsha Jones, I’m a thirty-eight-year-old “Xennial” (Gen X/Millennial cusp), native and current Detroiter. This is #MyRenaFiStory. I have two daughters, twelve and six, and a fifteen-year-old stepson. In the last decade, I’ve filed for bankruptcy and divorce, remarried, had another child, changed careers twice, purchased a home and went broke. Telling the story of how my upbringing and experiences of almost four decades have brought me to my present state is complicated and lengthy so I’ll give you the Readers’ Digest version.

Growing up in 80s Detroit, I saw a lot; the city was heavily segregated and losing thousands of residents every year. There was an annual tradition of massive arson lasting up to a week that would begin on “Devil’s Night”, the night before Halloween where hundreds of buildings were set ablaze.

Responses

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

X
X
X